Q. What happens to my skin in the sun?

A. The redness and eventual tanning that we see on our skin after sun-bathing is a response to the reaction that occurs when ultraviolet rays reach our skin. UV radiation causes chemicals to be released and fluids to leak out from our cells. This damage can lead to inflammation and the red soreness we call sun-burn. Unfortunately, the effects of sun continue to develop for several hours after sun exposure, so it’s easy to think you haven’t burnt yourself only to find out later that evening that you are a bright shade of lobster!

Q. Why is it dangerous to get sunburnt?

A. There are two types of UV radiation – UVA and UVB. UVA penetrates the deep layers of the skin and is a contributory factor in skin cancer and premature skin aging. UVB penetrates the upper layers of the skin leading to the uncomfortable skin burning described above. With their sunny climates, low ozone and outdoor lifestyles, Australians and New Zealanders have the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, but the incidence of the disease is growing rapidly in this country too. To product yourself, use a high factor sun-cream and re-apply it regularly throughout the day – even if the cream claims to be waterproof!

Q. How can sunburn be treated?

A. If you do get sunburnt you can ease the pain and inflammation with an Aloe Vera cream, which will help your skin feel better and aid the healing process. Calendula also helps reduce soreness and redness, as does St John’s Wort, which can be applied directly to the skin once it has been diluted in accordance with the instructions. You can treat sunburn on eyelids with cooled used tea bags: both green and black tea work well. Drink lots of water and if you feel unwell or the burn is extreme, consult a doctor.

Q. Why do my hair and nails look badly out of condition in the summer?

A. A little bit of sunshine can make us feel great, but too much sun and sea can cause havoc with the condition of our hair, skin and nails. Vitamin E is a powerful anti-oxidant that our bodies need to maintain muscles, nerves and skin. Taking a supplement of vitamin E well before you are exposed to the sun and continuing it through your holiday will help. Myrhh is a good treatment for dry skin; Lavender is great for hands and nails; Neroli is soothing and makes a lovely conditioner for your hair, whilst Tea Tree oil is antiseptic and non-drying and an excellent cure for dandruff. If you buy these as essential oils remember to dilute them before use. Baldwins helpline staff are always delighted to help you with your choice of products. Contact them on 020 7703 5550.

Q. What happens to my skin in the sun?

A. The redness and eventual tanning that we see on our skin after sun-bathing is a response to the reaction that occurs when ultraviolet rays reach our skin. UV radiation causes chemicals to be released and fluids to leak out from our cells. This damage can lead to inflammation and the red soreness we call sun-burn. Unfortunately, the effects of sun continue to develop for several hours after sun exposure, so it’s easy to think you haven’t burnt yourself only to find out later that evening that you are a bright shade of lobster!

Q. Why is it dangerous to get sunburnt?

A. There are two types of UV radiation – UVA and UVB. UVA penetrates the deep layers of the skin and is a contributory factor in skin cancer and premature skin aging. UVB penetrates the upper layers of the skin leading to the uncomfortable skin burning described above. With their sunny climates, low ozone and outdoor lifestyles, Australians and New Zealanders have the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, but the incidence of the disease is growing rapidly in this country too. To product yourself, use a high factor sun-cream and re-apply it regularly throughout the day – even if the cream claims to be waterproof!

Q. How can sunburn be treated?

A. If you do get sunburnt you can ease the pain and inflammation with an Aloe Vera cream, which will help your skin feel better and aid the healing process. Calendula also helps reduce soreness and redness, as does St John’s Wort, which can be applied directly to the skin once it has been diluted in accordance with the instructions. You can treat sunburn on eyelids with cooled used tea bags: both green and black tea work well. Drink lots of water and if you feel unwell or the burn is extreme, consult a doctor.

Q. Why do my hair and nails look badly out of condition in the summer?

A. A little bit of sunshine can make us feel great, but too much sun and sea can cause havoc with the condition of our hair, skin and nails. Vitamin E is a powerful anti-oxidant that our bodies need to maintain muscles, nerves and skin. Taking a supplement of vitamin E well before you are exposed to the sun and continuing it through your holiday will help. Myrhh is a good treatment for dry skin; Lavender is great for hands and nails; Neroli is soothing and makes a lovely conditioner for your hair, whilst Tea Tree oil is antiseptic and non-drying and an excellent cure for dandruff. If you buy these as essential oils remember to dilute them before use.

Baldwins helpline staff are always delighted to help you with your choice of products. Contact them on 020 7703 5550.

View our selection of Essential Oils.

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